Our Team

We have a growing team of music therapists, all of whom are passionate about social justice issues and strive to work in a way that is respectful of identity and empowering young people to use music as a tool for growth, development and self expression. We are all trained as music therapists through the Master of Music Therapy programme with the New Zealand School of Music (NZSM) at Victoria University, Wellington. We are registered with our governing body Music Therapy New Zealand and hold current Practising Certificates. Supervision and ongoing Professional Development are requirements for our Registration and renewal of Practising Certificate.

Emily smiling at the camera holding a guitar with greenery in the background

Emily Langlois Hunt

Director, Registered Music Therapist, Supervisor

MMusTh (Hons), CT Counselling (CPCAB), CT music teaching (ABRSM), BA (Theology), PhD (Theology)

Copyeditor for Voices: A World Forum for Music Therapy

Language consultant for Approaches: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Music Therapy

I worked as an itinerant piano, voice and harp teacher for over 15 years, as well as teaching Kodály music education classes to children aged 0-7. Several paths led me to explore music therapy and I started retraining as a music therapist in 2015. I specialised in working with children in mainstream primary school settings and graduated in 2019.

My orientation as a therapist is heavily influenced by parenting my neurodivergent children and my own experiences as a neurodivergent person with a hidden disability and a chronic illness. I am passionate about social justice issues and developing neuro-affirming practices, as well as supporting other music therapists and allied health professionals on their own journeys. I find play-based learning models a really useful tool in framing music therapy practice that is child-led, strengths-based and resource-oriented. I have a strong interest in academic and creative writing.

TJ Hernandez

 

Registered Music Therapist (Provisional)

MMusTh (Hons), BA in Music and Psychology

Music therapist in private practice with young adults.

TJ Hernandez tiny20

I’m a first generation Filipino and a recent graduate from the masters of music therapy program at Te Herenga Waka, Victoria University of Wellington. Through my studies, I was drawn to person-centred and strengths-based approaches as I saw how music brought out the unique identities of the people I worked with. The exploration of identity is something close to my heart, as my exegesis focused on how I navigated my Filipino identity as a music therapist. I discovered that music was especially useful in creating space for myself and music therapy participants to explore our identities together. Using music in this way deepened our therapeutic relationships, and also fostered a sense of curiosity and wonderment. 

Now that I have completed my studies I’m excited to see how I can further hone my skills in a professional environment. My goals are to further solidify who I want to be as a newly qualified music therapist and continue to explore how I can use my intersectional identities to empower others to express their unique selves.

Marianne headshot

Marianne Wren

Registered Music Therapist (Provisional – pending)

MMusTh (pending), 

Music therapist

I am from Tāmaki Makaurau and spent the last two years in Te Whanganui-a-tara revelling in all it has to offer. My whakapapa extends across the world to Zimbabwe, Switzerland, Ireland & England. I grew up playing the violin and piano, and was quickly drawn to exploring the guitar and song-writing.

For myself, music, and the act of sharing musical spaces has always been a source of deeply meaningful connections. Through music therapy, I hope to support meaningful musical connections and be led by the people I work with.

During my studies, I was drawn to addressing ableism within music therapy practices and processes as well as in a much broader context. Engaging with post-ableist music therapy (PAMT) has been a profound experience, guiding me to uncover subtle manifestations of ableism within music therapy practices. I found that resource-oriented music therapy and strength-based practices were a way to work in a post-ableist and neurodiverse affirming way. I am so thrilled to be working with the Little Musical Caravan and with a team that strives to work in an affirming and anti-oppressive way!

Liz Langham RMT

Liz Langham

Registered Music Therapist (Provisional)

MMusTher (Hons), Te Rōnakitanga ki te Reo Kairangi (Level 5, Te Wānanga o Aotearoa), MSW(Appl) (Hons), PGCertHealthSci (AOD Studies), PGDipArts, BA, ATCL. 

Music therapist, social worker, professional supervisor (social work). 

Kia ora! Mālo ni! Kia orana! Tālofa! Warm greetings to you wherever you are from. My family have been in Aotearoa for six generations as tangata tiriti. I regard it as a privilege to live and learn together in this part of the world. 
 
I have woven together my passion for people, expressive arts and community-building in different ways through my career as a social worker, AOD (Alcohol and Other Drugs) Practitioner, community worker, parent, educator, supervisor and music therapist. The strengths-based and post-ableist values of the Little Musical Caravan are a great fit with my commitment to social justice and transformation through the arts. Personal and professional experiences have shaped my understanding that it is possible for everyone to be both uniquely capable AND to need support. I believe that musical relationships offer a way for us to discover, learn and grow together in ways that help us to become more resourceful in the wider world. 
 
Poipoia te kākano, kia puāwai. Nurture the seed and it will blossom. 

Interested in joining our team?

To work with the LMC you would:

  • Hold a Masters in Music Therapy (or equivalent)
  • Be a Registered Music Therapist (provisional or full) with our governing body Music Therapy New Zealand
  • Have experience or an interest in in working with children and young people and a passion for exploring post-ableist and culturally sensitive practice

If this sounds like you, we want to hear from you! We can offer a supportive, collaborative environment to support personal and professional growth.

For more information about registration, please contact Music Therapy New Zealand.

For more information about training to be a Music Therapist, please contact the Music Therapy department at Te Kōkī NZSM, Victoria University, Wellington.